Old 01-10-2018, 03:41 PM   #1
kismetandkarma
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Post Father enlisted June 1941 w/2nd Armoured Brigade Company

I have his full service records, all 226 pages of them, however I wonder if there is a way to find out what operations he was a part of? A lot of "place of caualty" is listed as either UK, NWE, etc. but there are quite a few with simply "field"

I know chances of finding any one who served with him that is still living is a shot in the dark, but hoping to maybe even connect with someone who knew of someone who served with him as well as more information about his service.

Very quick synopsis of records follows:

Enlisted in the 2nd CAB Coy June 6, 1941 as an OR in the RCASC (what is an OR?)
Embarked Halifax on 9/10/41 and landed Liverpool UK 10/10/41. Unit 2CABC (AP)
Changed Units between Jan 12 and Feb 5 1943 from 2CAB Coy to 5CAB Coy
Embarked England 10/26/1943, disembarked Italy 11/8/1943 Unit 5CAB Coy
Embarked Italy 2/22/1945, disembarked France 2/24/1945 Unit 5CAB Coy

He returned to the UK in Dec 1945 and remained in England as a musician of the 35 piece Army Show orchestra and came back to Canada in 1946.

He served in England, Italy, and "Northwest Europe" as a Driver and a Dispatch Rider.
(from records): "He remained in the RCASC (CA (R) as an OR, attaining the rank of S sgt, until promoted Lt (Class Offr Gp B) in July 1959.
From July 1959 to June 1961, he was employed as FSO at CFMSTC, Camp Borden, and was then posted to RMC where he served until July 1963 when he was posted to 13 Pers Depot Ottawa for release."

There are many handwritten reports and transfers, but all the acronyms are confusing to a lay civilian such as myself. Example, what do the following stand for / mean?:

"S O S to G. S Br NDHQ"
"T O S fr AG. Br NDHQ"
"Att'd to CBTD for RQD, Unit 2CABC(AP)"
"Cease to be att'd 1CBTD"
"Adn to 4CCS"
"Disc from 4CCS"


Upon his return to Canada and acceptance into the CA(R) he remained with the CS Branch ABQ (where is this?) and then completed the Battle Intelligence Course and became an Intelligence Specialist Gp III (what is this?)

Link to his service records (with names and DOB edited):
https://www.dropbox.com/s/7n4va2dbqe...ected.pdf?dl=0

Any help at all is greatly appreciated.
Thank you
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Old 01-10-2018, 04:52 PM   #2
BFBSM
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SOS and TOS stand for struck of strength and taken on strength, respectively.

CCS is Casualty Clearance station. (In this case find it's location and you will have a 'general' area for the activities of the unit.)

The others I shall need to look at a little harder.

Mark

Last edited by BFBSM : 01-10-2018 at 04:54 PM.
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Old 01-10-2018, 06:22 PM   #3
kismetandkarma
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Originally Posted by BFBSM View Post
SOS and TOS stand for struck of strength and taken on strength, respectively.

CCS is Casualty Clearance station. (In this case find it's location and you will have a 'general' area for the activities of the unit.)

The others I shall need to look at a little harder.

Mark

Thank you Mark,
Can you explain what struck of strength and taken on strength would mean?

Regarding the CCS, it was in the UK when he was with the 5CAB Coy unit - he was admitted Sept 16, 1943 and discharged Oct 5, 1943. The UK is a large area and unfortunately that's all I have. Is a CCS someplace for injured soldiers or does 'casualty' mean something else in this context?

When he was alive, he would tell me that his scars on his arm were from shrapnel, and that the scar on his neck was from riding into a guy wire, but I don't see anything in the medical files to corroborate his stories.
Unfortunately, he passed when I was 12 and an age where I didn't know what to ask him.

Thank you for your help - it means a great deal
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Old 01-10-2018, 07:09 PM   #4
Temujin
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Originally Posted by kismetandkarma View Post
Thank you Mark,
Can you explain what struck of strength and taken on strength would mean?

Regarding the CCS, it was in the UK when he was with the 5CAB Coy unit - he was admitted Sept 16, 1943 and discharged Oct 5, 1943. The UK is a large area and unfortunately that's all I have. Is a CCS someplace for injured soldiers or does 'casualty' mean something else in this context?

When he was alive, he would tell me that his scars on his arm were from shrapnel, and that the scar on his neck was from riding into a guy wire, but I don't see anything in the medical files to corroborate his stories.
Unfortunately, he passed when I was 12 and an age where I didn't know what to ask him.

Thank you for your help - it means a great deal
Struck off Strength means he “left this unit”
Taken on Strength means he “joined this unit”

Also, OR means “Other Rank”.......all men below NCO rank (Lance Corporal is the lowest NCO rank) was called an “Other Rank”

Medical services were organized as such:

From the battlefield, a wounded soldier was moved by stretcher-bearers to his unit’s Regimental Aid Post, from which he was evacuated by ambulance. The RAP was set up in haste to deal with the wounded as quickly as possible, so only very basic treatment was available

The Field Ambulance was the organization responsible for evacuation and treatment of casualties forward of the Casualty Clearing Station (CCS). Field Ambulance units were assigned to support specific brigades

The next step was evacuation to a Field Dressing Station, where intermediate treatment could be offered before transfer to a Casualty Clearing Station, a basic hospital for surgery and short-term convalescence.

So, a CCS was a field hospital
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Old 01-10-2018, 07:19 PM   #5
Temujin
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Originally Posted by kismetandkarma View Post
Thank you Mark,
Can you explain what struck of strength and taken on strength would mean?

Regarding the CCS, it was in the UK when he was with the 5CAB Coy unit - he was admitted Sept 16, 1943 and discharged Oct 5, 1943. The UK is a large area and unfortunately that's all I have. Is a CCS someplace for injured soldiers or does 'casualty' mean something else in this context?

When he was alive, he would tell me that his scars on his arm were from shrapnel, and that the scar on his neck was from riding into a guy wire, but I don't see anything in the medical files to corroborate his stories.
Unfortunately, he passed when I was 12 and an age where I didn't know what to ask him.

Thank you for your help - it means a great deal
Struck off Strength means he “left this unit”
Taken on Strength means he “joined this unit”

Medical services were organized as such:

From the battlefield, a wounded soldier was moved by stretcher-bearers to his unit’s Regimental Aid Post, from which he was evacuated by ambulance. The RAP was set up in haste to deal with the wounded as quickly as possible, so only very basic treatment was available

The Field Ambulance was the organization responsible for evacuation and treatment of casualties forward of the Casualty Clearing Station (CCS). Field Ambulance units were assigned to support specific brigades

The next step was evacuation to a Field Dressing Station, where intermediate treatment could be offered before transfer to a Casualty Clearing Station, a basic hospital for surgery and short-term convalescence.

So, a CCS was a field hospital

In order to “track” his movements while in the Army, what you would need to do is first determine each unit that he was assigned to (these are all in his records)......then you would need to look up each unit he belonged to and either look at their histories or their war diaries to see where they were each day. This takes quite a bit of work to go thru all the records etc etc.

Also, even if he was “with” a specific unit, you would still not know what “part” of that unit he was with and his specific job. One of the ways of finding this out is looking at each units Part 2 Daily Orders. These are published “almost daily” in each unit, and give all the info on the day to day happenings of the unit, who was posted in, posted out, went on medical, training etc etc. Their is no way to guarantee that his name would be in those, but the best method of find this out..

Needless to say, all of the above takes a lot of work and record reading.

We will try and help you as much as possible, so if you continue to post up your questions here, (hopefully with the info from his records) we can point you in the right direction of give you as much info as we can.
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Old 01-10-2018, 10:36 PM   #6
kismetandkarma
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Originally Posted by Temujin View Post
S



In order to “track” his movements while in the Army, what you would need to do is first determine each unit that he was assigned to (these are all in his records)......then you would need to look up each unit he belonged to and either look at their histories or their war diaries to see where they were each day. This takes quite a bit of work to go thru all the records etc etc.

Also, even if he was “with” a specific unit, you would still not know what “part” of that unit he was with and his specific job. One of the ways of finding this out is looking at each units Part 2 Daily Orders. These are published “almost daily” in each unit, and give all the info on the day to day happenings of the unit, who was posted in, posted out, went on medical, training etc etc. Their is no way to guarantee that his name would be in those, but the best method of find this out..

Needless to say, all of the above takes a lot of work and record reading.

We will try and help you as much as possible, so if you continue to post up your questions here, (hopefully with the info from his records) we can point you in the right direction of give you as much info as we can.

Any idea of where or how one would get the war diaries? I have the units listed in his record (the dropbox link) and I believe it's worth the time and effort to research. I've tried to look online as to where the 2 CAB Coy was during the times that he was overseas, as well as the general WWII happenings within the countries I know he was in based on his records, but I don't have any knowledge of cities, towns, etc.

Based on what I know, he was a dispatch rider.


At some point, I would like to get out to CFB Borden again as well as RMC to get some information post war.

Thanks so much for all your help
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Old 01-11-2018, 03:29 PM   #7
Temujin
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Unit War Diaries at at LAC in Ottawa. You would either have to go their to see the records, or hire a private researcher to go thru all the records for you.

The 2 CAB Company would travel “anywhere” the 2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade went. So if you were to look at their travels??? It would give your a general sense of where the 2 CAB Coy also went.
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Old 01-10-2018, 05:33 PM   #8
ludford101
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Originally Posted by kismetandkarma View Post
(what is an OR?)
Ordinary ranks.
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