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Old 03-20-2017, 08:11 PM   #1
Heather Smith
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Default Royal Winnipeg Rifles 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Infantry Division

Hi,
Can you please help me to find the a/n nominal roll? The information prior to D-Day, when my uncle was killed is the specific one I am searching for.

How would these rolls be kept updated with so many deaths occurring?

What would happen to the bodies of the men who were killed in the landing, as well as at other times in the battles? I am not being ghoulish. I really do want to try to understand what happened to these men who sacrificed their lives for us.

Heather
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Old 03-20-2017, 10:03 PM   #2
Temujin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heather Smith View Post
Hi,
Can you please help me to find the a/n nominal roll? The information prior to D-Day, when my uncle was killed is the specific one I am searching for.

How would these rolls be kept updated with so many deaths occurring?

What would happen to the bodies of the men who were killed in the landing, as well as at other times in the battles? I am not being ghoulish. I really do want to try to understand what happened to these men who sacrificed their lives for us.

Heather
Nominal rolls for the regiment may be available at LAC Heather. Having said that, I'll check to see if I have one for the RWR

Who kept the records "up to date", these were the clerical staff that each unit had. They would update records each day, send in casualty reports, requests for rienforcements etc etc. A Army RUNS on forms, paperwork......even in war.

The actually casualties were handled by different people, sometimes the unit Priest or Miinister, sometimes follow up troops etc. Sometimes the unit had time to care for the bodies themselves, if they had time. If they had to move forward before they could tend for the bodies, they marked them. At lot of times wounded and dead were sent back to the Battalion RAP, who then ensure the dead were buried.

So the bodies may have been buried near where they became casualties, possibly in local grave yards, sometimes in the fields that they were killed. Sometimes in groups near wear the RAP was. The info from the body (1/2 his ID disk) and any immediate effects (letters, or other items) were sent to the unit clerks, who then started the death registration process. The location of the body was marked and info sent back.

Of course if a man died of his wounds, the unit that was taking care of him then, (Field Ambulance, Casualty Clearing Station, General Hospital etc) took care of burial.

After the fighting moved forward, graves registration units moved in to recorded each grave, make sure it was marked clearly. This was because the Commonwealth Governments had previously agreed that all servicemen and women who died during WW2 would be buried "where they died" and that the bodies (after hostilities ended) would be gathered (dis-interred) and buried at designated Commonwealth War Cemeteries. They would NOT be sent home to Canada. This was different then the Americans. In the US, families could have the body sent home for burial, or they could decide they should remain and buried in an American Cemetery in the country they died.

This work was actually started before the war ended. The Royal Canadian Engineers formed 3 Cemetary Construction Units, which started the process of moving the graves to this larger centralized war grave sites and construction of new sites etc. They used contracted labour in the different countries to do the actual work of construction. And it did take some years to complete the headstones for all the casualties.

Families were sent a photo of the temporary cross over the grave, and told exactly where they were buried. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission took over the process, sent families a letter giving them choices of markings on the headstone (mostly the inscription below the standard information) and to ensure the correct religious markings (Christian, Jewish, etc etc)

British headstones have the Regiments Badge on them, Canada decided that ALL headstones would have the Maple Leaf over them, as you can see on any Canadian Headstones.

If you have any other questions, please let me know
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Old 03-20-2017, 10:20 PM   #3
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Some of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission documents






You can see on the next list, that almost all of these men were originally buried at Greye Sur Mer, then all move in Dec 1944 to the Canadian Military Cemetary at Beny Sur Mer, Riviers




Last edited by Temujin : 03-21-2017 at 12:01 AM.
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Old 03-20-2017, 10:34 PM   #4
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More document. The first document would have been filled out by a unit clerk of the RWR




On this document, filled out "probably" by a Graves registration Unit, you can see where he was "originally buried"



And the letter, accompanying a photo of the 'temporary cross" when his remains were now

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Old 03-20-2017, 10:46 PM   #5
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Here's some additional info, these are pages from the War Diaries of the Senior Protestant Chaplain of the 3rd Cdn Division. You can see how busy he, and his chaplains were, and how sometimes "they personally" undertook the burial of the dead



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Old 03-20-2017, 11:12 PM   #6
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A screen shot of a WW2 map, they both have a red star on the location of his original grave. They are both the same map, the second is a closer screen shot



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Old 03-20-2017, 11:21 PM   #7
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Found this info

As soon as it was safe following a period of fighting, the dead would be gathered and placed in a communal place, and as soon after as possible, buried in a temporary grave before being moved to a permanent cemetery. In the case of those who died on 6 June 1944 on Juno Beach, a place called “Mr. Guddeville’s Orchard” served as the temporary grave site before the soldiers were moved to Bény-sur-Mer or other Canadian War Cemeteries in the area.


https://www.junobeach.org/difficulti...g-death-dates/
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:21 PM   #8
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Thank you for all the information and the map. Is Beny-sur-Mer close to the temporary grave? Is it Bernier-sur-Mercedes?

Heather
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:29 PM   #9
Heather Smith
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What I was trying to ask was, "is Berny-sur-Mer the same place as Bernieres-sur-Mer"?
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Old 03-20-2017, 11:35 PM   #10
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Air Photo of Greye Sur Mer 6 Jun 1944



Inland from JUNO Beach, the village of Graye-sur-Mer was captured by Canadian troops. In this image, troops can be seen advancing carefully along the main street, heading south-east.

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