Old 08-17-2015, 07:19 PM   #11
hooky14
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Default Canadians in Vietnam

We sent the ICCS to assist in supervising the cease fire in 1973 (I am led to understand that more were killed on both during that particular period than ever before), one of our peacekeepers was killed and our government sent my destroyer in case we had to get the army (the death and glory boys :) out in a hurry. It is normal for naval associations to honour a ship but we Terra Nova's are the only group ever to honour a single deployment. We were told on a friday afternoon we were sailing on monday morning and the skipper told us half way across the pacific we were going to Vietnam. We lost one of our ships company and dropped 1/3 of our people all over south east asia at one point. We were gone 6 months. I live in Windsor and hear constantly about Canadians who served in the US forces and how they have been ignored by our government. I have a hard time with their complaint as i regard US ! as Canadians who served OUR country in Vietnam. Incidentally i think there is a law that says NO person may serve in the armed forces of another country without the permission of the Canadian Government and her majesty by extension who is the Commander in chief of the Canadian Armed forces..
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Old 08-17-2015, 09:11 PM   #12
Temujin
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Originally Posted by hooky14 View Post
We sent the ICCS to assist in supervising the cease fire in 1973 (I am led to understand that more were killed on both during that particular period than ever before), one of our peacekeepers was killed and our government sent my destroyer in case we had to get the army (the death and glory boys :) out in a hurry. It is normal for naval associations to honour a ship but we Terra Nova's are the only group ever to honour a single deployment. We were told on a friday afternoon we were sailing on monday morning and the skipper told us half way across the pacific we were going to Vietnam. We lost one of our ships company and dropped 1/3 of our people all over south east asia at one point. We were gone 6 months. I live in Windsor and hear constantly about Canadians who served in the US forces and how they have been ignored by our government. I have a hard time with their complaint as i regard US ! as Canadians who served OUR country in Vietnam. Incidentally i think there is a law that says NO person may serve in the armed forces of another country without the permission of the Canadian Government and her majesty by extension who is the Commander in chief of the Canadian Armed forces..
HMCS Terra Nova was the first ship selected: ordered to return to Esquimalt “with dispatch” on 26 January, she prepared for the deployment over the course of the weekend and sailed on 29 January under the name WESTPLOY 1/73. HMCS Terra Nova was ordered to remain within 36 hours sailing of any of the designated Vietnamese evacuation ports, but rather than simply maintain station, she was also ordered to exercise with whatever American, Australian, British, or New Zealand warships she might encounter. Provisioning would be carried out at Bangkok, Hong Kong, Singapore, or Subic Bay in the Philippines as required, supplemented by 437 Squadron Boeings transporting spare parts, mail, and miscellaneous other supplies. Although the initial evacuation plan had been prepared by the MCCD in consultation with US naval authorities on 12 February, it was updated by the MCCD working with Terra Nova and, later, Kootenay.

HMCS Terra Nova was in her operational area by 3 March and, as instructed, conducted various exercises with Australian, British and New Zealand ships during her three month tour. When not in company with these vessels, she conducted readiness training. As originally ordered, she rendezvoused with her replacement, HMCS Kootenay, on 6 June in the Straits of San Bernardino between the islands of Luzon and Samar in the Philippines. In a four-hour turnover conducted at sea, Terra Nova briefed Kootenay before heading back to Esquimalt.

HMCS Kootenay had left Esquimalt on 14 May, on Westploy 2/73. Kootenay’s routine was similar to that of Terra Nova, exercising with American and Australian naval vessels, and assisting broken-down fishermen. When the Canadian continent left Saigon on 31 July, she was just fifty miles off the coast, the closest either ship was allowed to approach Vietnam. Kootenay then proceeded home to Esquimalt.

Last edited by Temujin : 08-17-2015 at 09:14 PM.
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Old 08-18-2015, 11:29 PM   #13
ludford101
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Originally Posted by hooky14 View Post
We sent the ICCS to assist in supervising the cease fire in 1973 (I am led to understand that more were killed on both during that particular period than ever before), one of our peacekeepers was killed and our government sent my destroyer in case we had to get the army (the death and glory boys :) out in a hurry. It is normal for naval associations to honour a ship but we Terra Nova's are the only group ever to honour a single deployment. We were told on a friday afternoon we were sailing on monday morning and the skipper told us half way across the pacific we were going to Vietnam. We lost one of our ships company and dropped 1/3 of our people all over south east asia at one point. We were gone 6 months. I live in Windsor and hear constantly about Canadians who served in the US forces and how they have been ignored by our government. I have a hard time with their complaint as i regard US ! as Canadians who served OUR country in Vietnam. Incidentally i think there is a law that says NO person may serve in the armed forces of another country without the permission of the Canadian Government and her majesty by extension who is the Commander in chief of the Canadian Armed forces..
Ah well, Canada turned a blind eye to the almost 10,000 US volunteers who joined the RCAF between 3 September 1939 and 7 December, 1941. I recall in the late 80s and 90s when some of these Canadian Vietnam vets were trying to be recognized. I saw one Bomber Command veteran call them "mercenaries" in the Winnipeg Free Press to which one Vietnam vet replied, "They paid us 90 bucks a month"

Anyway, the ICCS, International Commission for Control and Supervision, which some Canadian members referred to as meaning "I can't control sh*t" suffered one loss when Captain Charlie Laviolette of the 12 RBC was killed in a helicopter crash on 7 April, 1973. On 28 June 1973, two Canadian officers, Captains Ian Patten and Fletcher Thomson were kidnapped by the Viet Cong and released almost three weeks later. Patten, (pictured below) of 1 RCR, was later killed on another peacekeeping operation in Nicosia in 1975.

Take a look at your Canadian passport. There's a section in there that says that due to family ties you may be obliged to serve in another country's military.


Last edited by ludford101 : 08-18-2015 at 11:35 PM.
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Old 08-19-2015, 11:40 AM   #14
Temujin
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Canadian Government passed the Foreign Enlistment Act in April, 1937, to prevent men from signing up for foreign wars.

The Act has never been enforced but is still "on the books"

BUT, as the Canadian Passport says, if you are the holder of "dual citizenship" or born in another country, you could still be liable for service in that countries Armed Force's
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Old 09-05-2015, 07:00 PM   #15
hooky14
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Mehar! You might also acknowledge the 100 man ICCS contingent one of whom was killed. While your at it you might acknowledge my destoyer HMCS Tera Nova sent in support of the ICCS (two days noticeand we found out mid pacific where we were going) and our subsequent replacement after 6 months by HMCS Kootenay. We lost one of our ships company and dropped 1/3 of our ships company all over south east asia. It was scary to come down off watch and find more bunks empty. the essential problem was the first shipmate to get it died, LS Memnook. The point is these WERE Canadians serving their nation in Vietnam. Recognition of Canadians who served in a foreign army really aren't the same thing. As a matter of fact I believe there may still be a statute that forbids Canadians to serve in another country's armed forces without express permission of the Canadian Government.
I live in Windsor Ontario and i am getting tired frankly of hearing about Canadian Vietam veterans truth be known I may be the ONLY legitimate Canadian Vietnam veteran in Windsor.
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Old 07-05-2017, 10:14 AM   #16
Willy17
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Default Westploy 73

Hello hooky14.
I live in Windsor ontario and sailed Kootenay in 73 when we relieved Terra Nova in the Philippines. I didn't know there was so much history on it online. Very cool!
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Old 07-05-2017, 12:50 PM   #17
Temujin
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Hello hooky14.
I live in Windsor ontario and sailed Kootenay in 73 when we relieved Terra Nova in the Philippines. I didn't know there was so much history on it online. Very cool!
Hello Willy, welcome to the conversation (although an old post, but new info is great). My brother was also on the Kootenay on that deployment. He actually bought me a wedding present in Hong Kong (he had it made at a shop in HK) as the ship stopped their on its way to Vietnam.
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