Old 12-31-2014, 01:31 PM   #11
Temujin
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Frederick James Boulter Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Joseph Maxwell Boultbee Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Stuart Carlyle Blair Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Edward Blackburn Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Joseph Berry Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Sergeant April 22, 1915
Russell Bennett Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Andrew Leslie Bell Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Lieutenant April 22, 1915
Edward Machin Belcher Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
George Charles Barker Canadian Infantry (Western Ontario Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
George Barker Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Frederick William Banbrook Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Frank Fletcher Ball Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
George Avery Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Sydney Gordon Gober Atwill Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
James Armstrong Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Albert Percy Armstrong Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Douglas Anthony Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Charles Byron Amos Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment) Lance Corporal April 22, 1915
Henry Allison Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
John Allingham Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
George Samuel Ager Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment) Lieutenant April 22, 1915
John Abrahamsen Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Private April 22, 1915
Henry Charles Ablard Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) Sergeant April 22, 1915


Complete......Of course this list does not include men who may have been wounded on the 22nd April and died the following days or months.
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Old 12-31-2014, 01:38 PM   #12
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THE SECOND BATTLE OF YPRES
April 1915

At 4.30 p.m. on April 22nd the First Canadian Infantry Brigade,
Brigadier-General M. S. Mercer, was in reserve near and in the
city of Ypres. The Second Canadian Infantry Brigade, Brigadier-
General A. W. Currie, was in action, holding the right of the
Canadian line. The Third Canadian Infantry Brigade, Brigadier-
General R. E. W. Turner, V.C, D.S.O., occupied the left sector.
The three brigades of Canadian Field Artillery supported the
infantry.

This was the distribution of the division when, at the hour
named, the German Army launched a tremendous assault upon
the whole left of the Allied line in a great effort to break through
to Calais and the conflict knoAvn to history as the Second Battle
of Ypres began.

The day was sunny and peaceful, the afternoon drawing to
a close, when, so suddenly that it took every man in the trenches
completely by surprise, a light, misty cloud rose slowly from the
German position and, blown by a favourable Avind, rolled towards
the right flank of the French. The troops posted there suddenly
found themselves treacherously overwhelmed by choking clouds
of poison gas, an instrument of war as devilishly effective as it
was unexpected. Totally unprepared for such an attack, the
native troops, who feared nothing which they understood, broke,
and, mad with agony, reeling and tearing in frenzy at their
throats, staggered down the road to Ypres. As they went the
enemy's artillery burst into an eruption of fire, and many thousands
of men hurled themselves into the gap and swept over
the totally unprotected flank of the Canadian division.

Along the whole front held by the Dominion, shell after shell
burst, and the assault, unequalled by any previously launched
since war began, was simultaneously delivered at every point
within range of the gas cloud. The pitiful little body of Canadians
saw it coming. They saw that they were outnumbered beyond
hope of resistance, and so, because they saw it and knew the
awful consequences of a retreat, resolved to resist to the end.
They saw the French pouring in masses from their left, leaving
the flank utterly exposed to the advancing thousands, which
approached with appalling rapidity. Yet there was no panic,
though the men of the Third Brigade were gasping and sinking
in the edge of the gas zone and the myriad bayonets were closing
around them.

The guns behind the trenches, the moment the attack began,
opened fire upon the enemy, who were visible from the Observation
Posts as clouds of grey and blazing steel, moving down upon the
crashing trenches. These guns began hurling shrapnel into
the oncoming troops. The batteries of the Third Artillery Brigade
also took the mobs of men advancing into the French trenches
by surprise and poured a storm of shells into their gathering
crowds. Supported by this aid, the infantry hung on with grim
courage and for the moment held up the swaying thousands on
the very threshold of victory.

It was at once decided by the brigadier of the Third Infantry
Brigade that he could not possibly hold the original line, as it
then stood, a continued resistance in that position being certain
to end in the complete outflanking of the division. It was
therefore decided to move the brigade, fighting all the way,
until the line should form an angle with its apex resting on
the original left extremity of the division and its new arm covering
the Ypres-Poelcapelle Road. This meant that the force would
not only be holding its old line of trenches but would also be
strung out for over a mile southward. An effort was then to
be made to reunite with the French at the new left flank of the
Canadians and to hold the zigzag line thus formed, which would
represent the high-water mark of the German advance, should
the attempt to beat them back be successful.

Source: The Canadians in France 1914 to 1918
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Old 01-02-2015, 05:48 PM   #13
Daniel J Murphy
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OMG (as my daughters say) Temujin,

Thanks so much for the all the info. It's an unfortunate embarrassment of riches. I suppose I'll have to choose a soldier in a unit closest to where the French had melted away to have at least a shot at one of the first battle deaths. That said, I'll keep looking at the artillery unit histories to see if there is any mention of timing of the German barrage which I believe intensified just before the gas was released.
Thanks again,

Daniel
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Old 01-02-2015, 08:42 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel J Murphy View Post
OMG (as my daughters say) Temujin,

Thanks so much for the all the info. It's an unfortunate embarrassment of riches. I suppose I'll have to choose a soldier in a unit closest to where the French had melted away to have at least a shot at one of the first battle deaths. That said, I'll keep looking at the artillery unit histories to see if there is any mention of timing of the German barrage which I believe intensified just before the gas was released.
Thanks again,

Daniel

Artillery Units for the 1st Canadian Division were:


1st Brigade Canadian Field Artillery
1st Field Battery
3rd Field Battery
4th Field Battery
2nd Howitzer Battery

2nd Brigade Canadian Field Artillery
5th Field Battery
6th Field Battery
7th Field Battery

The remainder of the Division was:

1st Infantry Brigade
1st Trench Mortar Battery
1st Battalion (Western Ontario), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ
2nd Battalion (Easter Ontario), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ
3rd Battalion (Toronto Regiment), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ IP (Jon430)
4th Battalion (Central Ontario), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ

2nd Infantry Brigade
2nd Trench Mortar Battery
5th Battalion (Western Cavalry), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ
7th Battalion (1st British Columbia Regiment), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ IP (Thierens)
8th Battalion (90th Rifles), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ
10th Battalion (Canadians), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ IP (Leroux)

3rd Infantry Brigade
3rd Trench Mortar Battery
13th Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ
14th Battalion (Royal Montreal Regiment), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ
15th Battalion (48th Highlanders of Canada), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ
16th Battalion (The Canadian Scottish), Mobilized at Valcartier PQ IP (Burns)
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Old 01-02-2015, 08:49 PM   #15
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War Dairy from the 1st Canadian Divisional Artillery

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Old 01-02-2015, 08:55 PM   #16
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War Diaries of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Brigade








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Old 01-02-2015, 09:06 PM   #17
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War Diary 1st Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery

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Old 01-02-2015, 09:11 PM   #18
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War Dairy 2nd Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery

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Old 01-02-2015, 09:19 PM   #19
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For an excellent account of the 2nd Ypres, almost a minute by minute account with maps etc, please see this website:

http://www.greatwar.co.uk/battles/se...el-summary.htm

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Old 01-02-2015, 09:48 PM   #20
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The 1st Canadian Division bore the brunt of the German attack on the left wing of the British line. At the time of the attack each Canadian battalion was at the strength of approximately 30 officers and 950 men.

On 22nd April 1915, according to the Canadian Official History(4), the number of casualties (killed, died of wounds, wounded, missing presumed dead and prisoners) for the 1st Canadian Division was 642 by the end of the day. Some of the casualties included in this figure are, however, believed to have been killed or wounded in the early hours of the next day, 23rd April, particularly in the case of 2nd Canadian Battalion. This battalion went into action after moving up from the reserve just after midnight on 22nd April, but its casualty figure has been included in the total for the 22nd April.

Total casualties for 3rd Canadian Infantry Brigade was 177:
13th Battalion: 3 officers and 42 other ranks
14th Battalion: 1 officer and 16 other ranks
15th Battalion: 1 officer and 24 other ranks
16th Battalion: 3 officers and 87 other rank

Major E C Norsworthy, commander of 3rd Company 13th Canadian Battalion, had tried to hold his two platoons in position in the defensive flank formed along the St. Julien-Poelcappelle road(5). By the early hours of 23rd April both platoons and the 35 year old Major had been wiped out to the last man. Major Norsworthy's body was reburied after the war and he now lies in a grave in Tyne Cot British Military Cemetery, grave reference LIX.B.24.(6)

Lieutenant Guy Drummond, aged 27 was the son of the Honourable Sir George Drummond, KCMG, and Lady Drummond of Montreal. He was killed while trying to rally French troops who had joined the men of his 13th Battalion. His body was also reburied after the war in Tyne Cot British Military Cemetery, grave reference LIX.B.28.(7)

Total casualties for 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade was 147 (7 officers and 122 other ranks of these were from the 10th Battalion. This battalion's figures are listed on 22nd April because it went into action in the counter-attack on Kitchener's Wood just before midnight on that day).

Total casualties for 1st Canadian Infantry Brigade was 297 (239 of whom were other ranks from 2nd Battalion, which did not in fact go into action until the early hours of 23rd April).

Total casualties for 1st Canadian Divisional troops was 7.

Total casualties for 1st, 2nd and 3rd Canadian Field Artillery Brigades was 9.

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